My Content Curation Process

This entry was posted by on Saturday, 1 March, 2014 at

Content Curation ProcessDo you ever wonder how content curation occurs for social media? You’re not alone, I’m frequently asked what my process is and what tools I use.

To be honest, it’s a bit messy and manual, and probably not the most efficient.

I should probably describe the type of content curation I do, and for whom. Let’s start with the for whom.

Including my own, I manage three sets of accounts: Bianca/Tap Dancing Spiders, PSAMA and Chirpsy. All have fairly similar audiences, which makes things faster. One great blog post can be cross-posted across multiple accounts. I don’t do it all the time, just when it works. Oh, one caveat of cross-posting, keep audience duplication in mind. If there’s a fair amount of duplication, then you’ll just look spammy. The PSAMA audience is predominantly local to Seattle, and the other two are global. Minimal duplication.

The content curation process

My content comes from three sources. Human-crafted, pre-written Tweets from Chirpsy, manually curated content from RSS feeds in Feedly that are fed to Buffer , and original content I (and the PSAMA team) write on the fly.

This is where it gets messy and I’m still working on the right tools and process to make it work.

Each morning I jump into the Chirpsy dashboard and add three or four Tweets to the queue. It drip feeds them to @BiancaJSmith every two hours. I’ve set keywords in Chirpsy with writing guidelines, so I know the Tweets will be relevant content. I know you’re probably freaking at this level of trust. For the first month with Chirpsy I checked each link and monitored the performance. They aren’t quite the voice I use, but equally as effective. I have another feed into the @Chirpsy account, that’s linked to the facebook page, too. That one’s 100% automated, again it’s trust in the service.

Throughout the day I check on Feedly for anything coming in via RSS feed. If something looks good, I hit the Buffer button, select a few networks and it’s added to the queue. Buffer has pre-set optimal send times for each platform. With a global audience I don’t really care for time optimization, but it helps space things out. These are set to go to my personal feeds, but I pick and choose the networks. I’m definitely fussier with the content going to LinkedIn. If some of these are perfect for the PSAMA I manually share them on those feeds. I never add any to the @Chirpsy feed. That account’s to showcase the product. Messaging impact will be diminished if I supplement it. Oh, I forgot the copy. I rarely change it. The blog post authors have (or at least should have) chosen compelling titles, so I use that for the copy. I’ll sometimes add appropriate Twitter handles or hashtags, but it’s a quick and dirty process.

The final content curation process is manual. If there’s some timely news, I’ll post it to the relevant profile immediately. I also have alerts set for any mentions to action. I keep an eye on Twitter and facebook feeds to share anything there that’s relevant and join in the conversation. Sprout Social is the tool for this.

That’s the main stuff. I have left Pinterest out because I think of it as 100% personal, even though there is a strategy behind it and it’s probably the most pure content curation I do. I share communications pins and business book reviews on my Pinterest page , but I mainly post geeky stuff from Sherlock, Doctor Who and Harry Potter. It’s under my photography business name, so there’s a lot of photography too. Definitely more personality.

As I said at the start, it’s not a perfect content curation process and it’s already evolving. We’ve divided up the responsibilities on the PSAMA team, so we’re coordinating it all in HootSuite because multiple users is less expensive in HootSuite than in SproutSocial.

What’s your content curation process? Is it as haphazard as mine?

Disclaimers: I work with Chirpsy, and hold a volunteer board role with the PSAMA. Both are great organizations that I recommend you check out.

Bianca Smith (160 Posts)

Bianca is a freelance digital marketer in Seattle. She works with clients big and small, in the US and Australia, on digital marketing, branding, event communications, social media and website content.


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