Posts Tagged Career

So you want to be a Social Media Manager

Posted by on Monday, 15 September, 2014

Social Media ManagerI know I post a lot referencing Hootsuite, but so much of their content is on topic. Plus, as an Ambassador I get sent blog posts and Slideshares. Very convenient for when I’m in the middle of a semester, like now.

Recently I’ve been asked by a few people how to start a career as a digital marketer. I am working on a larger post, but Hootsuite has just released How To Be A Social Media Manager And Excel At It on Slideshare and it covers many of the same skills. Or should I quote it as hats?

This guide is great because it details the main skills needed to be a social media manager. Some are obvious, like community management and content curation, but being an expert social media manager is more. It’s lots of listening, and coaching and math. Yes, there’s lots of math. Other aspects of digital marketing as similar, whether it’s email, or websites, or SEM.

So until I can write up a proper digital marketing manager post, check this out.

How to be a Social Media Manager from Hootsuite

Book Review: Shift Your Brilliance

Posted by on Tuesday, 13 May, 2014

Now this is my type of self-help book. Last week, Simon T Bailey released his follow-up to Release Your Brilliance — Shift Your Brilliance.

To be honest, if I didn’t hear Simon speak at the American Marketing Association Leadership Conference, and receive a free copy of this book, I probably wouldn’t have read Shift Your Brilliance.

My life would have been worse for it.

You’ve read my thoughts on self-help books. I still can’t understand how anyone can think by following a script, there’s a guaranteed result. I digress, but it leads to why Shift Your Brilliance is different. Simon doesn’t tell you what to do. At one stage he even says to think INSIDE the box.

So what does Simon say?

He asks questions. He tells stories. He leads you to your own answers and actions. This is done through worksheets and quizzes mixed with anecdotes from both his experiences and those of his readers and friends. Occasionally he will add tips, but they are general, like having an accountability buddy to help you stay on track.

The goal of this book is for the reader to realize they are “O Brilliant One”. How you define that is up to you, the reader. I think that’s why I like Shift Your Brilliance. Everyone does have brilliance within, but often can’t see it. This book will walk you through looking at these issue differently to help you refind your brilliance. Thus the section on thinking inside the box.

The writing style is very conversational, making this a quick read. I had it half read by the time I got off the flight from Chicago. If I wasn’t overtired from three days at a conference and a busy few weeks beforehand, I would have finished it. That said, I didn’t do the exercises. I’m actually holding them off until a time when my brilliance is muted and I need to refocus. I didn’t learn anything new from Shift Your Brilliance or from hearing Simon speak. For me, it was a good reminder of what I need to do to keep a good attitude.

Who is Shift Your Brilliance for?

Anyone who’s feeling a bit trapped or despondent. This could be work, or life, or relationships, anything. Simon will take you through a self-evaluation to encourage you to look at the situation differently and help you decide how to act. Hands up if you’ve never needed that kind of help. No one? I thought so.

I’m already making a list of who I need to buy this book for, because I’m not giving up my copy. And if you ever get the chance to hear Simon present – go for it! You’ll be energized from his interactive presentation and amazing laugh.

As mentioned, Shift Your Brilliance was a gift from the American Marketing Association. They didn’t ask for a review, and these are my thoughts.

What’s your ROI?

Posted by on Tuesday, 11 March, 2014

What's your ROIMy first marketing lecturer, Dr Mario Miranda, taught me the relationship between price and quality. His example was a Waterman pen versus a Bic disposable. While my tastes are more Mont Blanc, the premise stands. Why do we choose Apple, Nordstrom and Mercedes Benz?

Why don’t we apply the same premise to ourselves? What’s your ROI? Does your price equal your quality?

I was chatting with a colleague last night about clients wanting expert work done at junior rates. We’ve all encountered it, “I’d love to hire you but [insert name] is $500 cheaper.” On eLance, I’m asked to pitch for work at hourly rates lower than the minimum wage in that country. The RFPs are filled with “expert” and “top performing”.

As marketers, we have a choice to make. We can take the work and discount our rates, or we can walk away. We can decide if we see ourselves as a Kia or a Mercedes Benz. In other words, what’s your ROI?

I know you’re thinking, “There’s more to the job than money, Bianca”, and I agree. Sometimes it’s a job title, resume points, or brand names that make up the difference. I’m doing some work currently that gives me studio photography experience. But that’s part of the ROI calculation. I gain experience and a small amount of cash; they get product photography.

It’s when the returns don’t equal or exceed investment (in this case you) it harms the entire industry. Precedents get set, your price goes down and you turn from Apple to Samsung. It’s hard to recover from this, and near impossible if it’s across the industry.

Yes, this was written as a vent over a recent situation, but also because walking away from a particular project was one of the hardest things I’ve done. The ROI figure just wasn’t a good result and saying yes now will mean it gets pushed further and further with each contract renewal. I hope I’m never in this situation again.

Book Review: Promote Yourself – The new rules for career success

Posted by on Saturday, 2 November, 2013

Promote Yourself Dan SchawbelIt’s hard to work out exactly why I don’t like Promote Yourself by Dan Schawbel. I’ve written many introductions and deleted them, all trying to find an objective reason.

I think it’s because there’s no clear audience identified.

There are many other reasons too, but they’re all subjective. The focus on millennials, the “it’s all about me” attitude, the instructions to do A and B to receive C. But these are disagreements, not reasons for it to be a bad book.

I know Dan Schawbel intends this book to be a career guide for millennials. I’m not convinced that’s who’ll get the most out of it.

I see the primary audience as early gen X and baby boomers who are struggling to relate to the younger members of their teams. The secondary is audience is millennials, but those who do well on tests, but struggle to make friends. The ones who want to be rich, famous and have an MBA, but lack an understanding of creativity or how.

Let me explain.

The first half of the book focuses on building your personal brand at work with the aim of getting promoted. Dan explains the need to network with the right people. He also explains how being a social media guru will make you indispensable, because no one older than “you” understands or can use the internet and computers. You can help them learn. But he also feels the need to explain what Twitter and Facebook are. By his reckoning, shouldn’t millennials already know that?

All through the book are to-do items. Take on an extra project, promote your wins, set up a personal website and you’ll be promoted. Sure there are caveats about over doing it and looking like a jerk, but I think the book (and its readers) would benefit from being told how and why. It’s there on a surface level, but reading this brought back memories of some jerks I’ve worked with. They knew how to tick boxes, but lacked the understanding to know which boxes should be ticked. One thing these jerks had in common was an MBA, giving them a great theoretical knowledge, but not the wisdom to apply it.

Which made me laugh at page 229: Should I Get an MBA? It’s probably the page I agreed with the most. No, an MBA isn’t mandatory, and is more useful in some companies than others. However, I’m not sure the entrepreneurs Dan used as examples of successful people without MBAs were the best to use. They each built their fortunes by making ideas happen, not by playing the game for a promotion large companies.

Promote Yourself isn’t all bad. Pointing out need to excel in your current job first is essential advice, dealing with job hopping and self-directed learning were other gems.

I’d love to give recommendations of alternative career books to read instead of this one, but it’s a sub-genre I tend not to read, so cannot. If anyone can, please add it to the comments. In the mean time, I’m sending this book to a millennial for his perspective.

How Can I Get A Job With No Marketing Experience

Posted by on Sunday, 14 July, 2013

20130714-211616.jpg
It’s a common lament with so many new grads around. How can I get experience if you won’t give me a job?

You don’t need a job to get experience.

I’m moving house and re-found this t-shirt. The team behind this event had minimal experience and most were at university studying things other than event planning. The event was one of the things that prompted me to study PR at grad school.

None of the team were paid. They did it for experience and fun.

They, myself included, have been rewarded a hundred times over. Ally Hallam was told her volunteer work was a large factor in gaining a retail job through university. Courtney Bezzina put it in her resume when applying for her first primary teaching role. It helped Rhianna Bezzina get into a film production course. I could go on.

So for all the new graduates, I congratulate you and ask how are you going to put experience on your résumé?

Apologies for the crazy formatting. I still don’t have wifi in my new apartment so this is via my phone.