Posts Tagged facebook

Share, Learn and Meet on facebook with TapDancingSpiders

Posted by on Tuesday, 7 October, 2014

Learning-on-facebookDid you see it? In the top right menu? that new little facebook button. TapDancingSpiders is now on facebook. Woohoo!

The facebook page has been a long time coming because I wanted to have a strong strategy behind it. There are so many marketing agencies and consultants just pushing self-promotion or sharing random content, and I didn’t want to add to the clutter. Plus, it would be hypocritical to go against my own advice, not to mention I’m too lazy to manage a profile for the sake of having an extra one.

So what is the strategy behind me being on facebook?

I want to make this all about you. I want to facilitate a place where we can learn and share ideas together. Digital marketing isn’t an exact science and we all have different backgrounds, experiences and education. I’m hoping that by sharing case studies and dilemmas to discuss we can bring together all the ideas and learn from each other.

What do you think? Are you in?

Pop on over to facebook, like the page and join the conversation. We’re currently looking at strategies to deal with unhappy customers who turn internet troll.

Let me know what you think, either in the comments or via email.

I hope you enjoy it.

The Impossible Post – Trying to categorize social media platforms

Posted by on Monday, 3 June, 2013

Social Media Audiences Research TableThis post could just as easily been called, “A blog post that takes three minutes to read takes three hours to write.”

This is about yesterday’s post. In summary, it tells how you can’t match social media platforms directly to audiences. If you haven’t read it, check it out.

I started researching and writing that post in March and spent lots of hours on it before posting. It changed focus three times and most of the research was discarded.

I tried matching each platform with a typical user profile. Something like, 30-40 year old mother, college educated, middle income = Pinterest. That one is reasonably accurate, but can’t be done for the other platforms. The platforms are all too general, and different people use them for different purposes.

Lots of stats were collated in the process and it would be a shame not to share. So here’s the base table.

Facebook Twitter Pinterest Tumblr Instagram Google+ LinkedIn
Active Members / Total Members > 1 billion / not disclosed 140 million / 500 million Unknown 108 million blogs Unknown / 80 million+ Unknown / 400 million Unknown / 200 million
Age 18-24 (33%) 25-34 (23%) 23-34 (30%) Under 25 Unknown Unknown 35-44 (26%)
Gender Female (57%) Female (55%) Female (80%) Unknown Unknown Male (68%) – 2011 data Male (65%)
Life Stage Unknown Has kids (55%) Settled, family (50% have kids), buying house late teens/ young adult Unknown Single (42% versus 27% married); Student (20%) Unknown
Education Unknown No college (49%) Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown College (50%)

Lots of the gaps come from generalized data not being released by the companies (ahem, facebook), or the data available being out-of-date or inconclusive. The Pew Research Center does some great work polling users to see their usage. Their research is limited by how they conduct the polls (via telephone), the rules governing polling minors (they decided not to, which skews away from Tumblr), and the size of their sample. For an international study, I don’t feel it can be statistically significant.

Other stats may be out there, but after several fruitless hours I gave up.

References used include:
Wikipedia: Tumblr
The Huffington Post: 100 Fascinating Social Media Statistics and Figures from 2012
facebook: Media Room – Key Facts
Linked In Facts and Figures (Infographic)
Pinteresting Enough: Who Uses Pinterest (Infographic)

Thank you to Matt Forsyth, Nicole Gary and Neil Parekh  for your help choosing which platforms and how to position the research.

PS, sorry for the silly-looking table. The site redesign is close and will make it look better.

The impossible question: Which social media platforms should I use?

Posted by on Monday, 3 June, 2013

Social Media apps

When you’re a kid, the big question is, “When’s Christmas?”. As a teen it’s “how can I get <insert name here> to like me?”. As a digital marketer it’s “which social media platforms should I be using?”

The only one with an easy answer is “when’s Christmas?”. But, as a five year old; I know I wasn’t happy with the answer: “in 20 sleeps”.

Choosing which social media platforms isn’t a straight forward process. Sorry. However, it can be done.

Start by looking at your target audience. Who are they? What do they do? Where do they play: facebook, Twitter, instagram, Tumblr? Standard segmenting questions. Ask them directly, if you want. They’ll appreciate the attention and you’ll be getting direct data.

Then play on those platforms. Yes, it’s really that simple.

The days of sell sheets with user base profiles are over. Social media gives us the ultimate personalization. One platform can reach many different demographic and psychographic groups. Each user will make it their own.

Does that mean you need to have a presence on all platforms? No. Find the critical mass for your target and play there. Make it cost and time effective. Remember, you’ll be researching their behavior, crafting content, curating third-party content and conversing directly with your audience. That takes time. It’s not worth all the work customizing all this to different platforms if not enough of your audience play there. That said, test things out. Just be prepared to drop it if it fails. It will and you’ll learn from it.

That’s enough from me. Go profile your audience and get playing. Now!

How to Limit Who Sees Your Facebook Posts

Posted by on Saturday, 16 March, 2013

So for most people reading this, facebook is a tool for your work and personal life, so you know it fairly well.

This is for my friends who aren’t so facebook aware and are confused by the settings. Disclaimer: this is valid as of today, March 15, 2013. Layout changes may and will occur.

All screen grabs are from a Graph Search enabled profile, so yours may be a little different.

To limit who can see your posts, click the cog symbol in the top right of the page and select “Privacy Settings”.

The top option has “Who Can See Your Future Posts?”. Click edit in that row.

Facebook Security Post Settings

As in the above option, click Custom to choose an option. You have several choices:

  • Public > anyone can see it
  • Friends > Your friends can see the post
  • Friends Except Acquaintances > this one is only applicable if you’ve marked some friends as acquaintances to down-grade their importance to you. This is a good way to stop sharing posts with people you don’t really like, but it’s inappropriate to unfriend. Yeah, you can interpret that which ever way you wish.
  • Only Me > Yes, only you can see these. Great for apps and silly spammy stuff.
  • Custom > Selecting this option means you can share posts with friends etc, except individuals whom you select.

Below that is an option for lists. Most people don’t have lists, but if you do, it’s the same kind of filtering.

Next move to the third row in that section.

Facebook Security Past Post Settings

Selecting “Limit Past Posts” to apply your newly created settings to your previous posts.

And you’re done. There’s no need to even save.

For those waiting on the social profile and media law posts, sorry. The quick posts are coming out easier and I have a huge, last-minute project in the works. All will be revealed soon. I’m excited.

What Makes a Good Facebook Post?

Posted by on Saturday, 24 November, 2012

How can you decide if a Facebook post is worth posting?

Use a Post Engagement Model, like this:

good_facebook_posts

A good facebook post will be in the top right quadrant. It will score high engagement AND high direct response (sale or actions depending on the product or business).

But how do you define what’s high engagement and high direct response? It’s tricky and depends on your business. I’ve chosen vacation markets for my hypothetical data and am really making unfair comparisons; 2,000 comments for one market may be amazing, but only average for another.

The solution is to standardize your markets or products. Track the engagement and direct response results for each market or product over 30 days to discover the average likes, comments, shares and your direct response metric. If you have data for a longer period, awesome. Anything shorter may not be indicative enough, but is definitely a good start.

Using the mean as 50, score the results out of 100. There’s no science here, so make it fit your business. If you’re not interested in shares, don’t use it. If clicks grab your attention, add those.

Merge the engagement metrics (average them? It’s up to you), and graph against a standardized direct response metric. Now you have something to reference when deciding between New York City and Hawaii.

(disclaimer: I work for Expedia, but this is fictitious data)