Posts Tagged IABC/Seattle

When to break the rules of research

Posted by on Sunday, 15 July, 2012

My lecturers would tear up my degrees if they saw the research project I’m doing with IABC/Seattle.

There was no written literature review, no demographic questions in the survey, and only two survey questions. It is the most successful research I have done.

The two questions ask what the chapter most wants to know from the members: which services do they like most, and which they could do without.

While this initially appears too simplistic, it’s supported by 16 hours and 50mb of data analysis. One of the aims was to get honest answers from the 150 local members. We decided we could only get that with total anonymity and having a small population means demographics would link responses with members. plus, the 50mb of data gave us a strong member profile.

So the survey is short to fit with our members’ limited time and so far the response rate exceeds my expectations.

As a bonus, Whitney Keys of Seattle PI agrees with keeping it simple. Thanks for your support, Whitney.

The best career advice I’ve ever heard

Posted by on Saturday, 15 October, 2011

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On Wednesday evening Curt Rosengren, Passion Catalyst, taught an IABC/Seattle audience the best piece of career advice and a tool to make it actionable.

We’ve all heard the advice to do what you love, but how do you work out exactly what that is? As Curt said, many of us love travel, but all for different reasons. Just accepting a job in travel may not make you happy.

The fist step is to make a list of the things we love (this is where the travel generalization came in).

Next, we asked ourselves why do we love these things and why do we love those ‘whys’. Curt recommended taking this down four levels, but with his clients he takes it as far as it can go.

These final things are what we’re really passionate about – the motivators that really drive us.

Mine came down to ‘new things/experiences’ and ‘making a difference’. Which really translates to me having a short attention-span but using that to constantly improve what needs to be improved. Yes, my weaknesses are also great strengths.

How can this help us in our careers? From this exercise what really motivates us an use it as a measure for any career opportunities. Does the job have the variety and learning opportunities to keep me active, along with the freedom to improve processes or results to make it worthwhile? If not, it’s not a good fit for me long term.

I recommend you do this exercise and discover your passions, motivators and strengths.

Want to learn more? Visit Curt Rosengren’s website for his ebooks and his coaching sessions.
Thanks to Nicole Allard for her notes on the session. Photography is mine. Even the photo of Nicole’s notes.

My social media life according to Klout

Posted by on Thursday, 22 September, 2011

I admit that I’m inconsistent on social media. I play in a lot of areas, but also work on many other social media projects too.

Klout thinks I’m more consistent. If I’m not active on my personal channels, I’m busy with the IABC/Seattle Twitter account.

Some Great Marketing Books To Fill The Time

Posted by on Tuesday, 24 May, 2011

As you’ve seen, my commitment to weekly blogs hasn’t been going that well. It’s all for a good purpose though. I’m working on IABC/Seattle‘s new WordPress site. It will be live in a few weeks and I’ll be back to normal programming.

In the meanwhile, here are a few of the marketing and business books I’ve either read recently or are on my shelf waiting to be read. Reviews will be coming soon, but don’t let that stop you starting on them now.

The Thank You Economy by Gary Vaynerchuk

Enchantment by Guy Kawasaki

Reality Check by Guy Kawasaki (can you see the trend here?)

Onward: How Starbucks Fought For Its Life Without Losing Its Soul by Howard Schultz

Have you read a great business or marketing book recently? Share it in the comments.