Posts Tagged Marketing

Share, Learn and Meet on facebook with TapDancingSpiders

Posted by on Tuesday, 7 October, 2014

Learning-on-facebookDid you see it? In the top right menu? that new little facebook button. TapDancingSpiders is now on facebook. Woohoo!

The facebook page has been a long time coming because I wanted to have a strong strategy behind it. There are so many marketing agencies and consultants just pushing self-promotion or sharing random content, and I didn’t want to add to the clutter. Plus, it would be hypocritical to go against my own advice, not to mention I’m too lazy to manage a profile for the sake of having an extra one.

So what is the strategy behind me being on facebook?

I want to make this all about you. I want to facilitate a place where we can learn and share ideas together. Digital marketing isn’t an exact science and we all have different backgrounds, experiences and education. I’m hoping that by sharing case studies and dilemmas to discuss we can bring together all the ideas and learn from each other.

What do you think? Are you in?

Pop on over to facebook, like the page and join the conversation. We’re currently looking at strategies to deal with unhappy customers who turn internet troll.

Let me know what you think, either in the comments or via email.

I hope you enjoy it.

Marketing Campaign Round-Up

Posted by on Sunday, 5 October, 2014

When was the last time you saw a brilliant marketing campaign? How about a not-so-brilliant one? I’ve seen a few around Seattle that fit each category.

First Aid Shot Therapy

No one likes a migraine, or even a hangover. First Aid Shot Therapy have a new treatment and a very innovative way to get the word out – while concurrently creating brand evangelists. If you live in Seattle or Boston and tweet about your migraine, hangover or just a headache you’re likely to get a response offering a sample pack of their new medication delivered to you, that day, for free.

The package is rather impressive too. It has samples of their headache remedy, and their stomach relief treatment. You can see the gorgeous box, filled with the medical background on their new treatments. Apologies for the missing one. I had a migraine.

First Aid Marketing Campaigns

I love their use of real-time marketing and it’s really not that hard to do. Many social media management platforms allow you to set up keyword searches within a specific geographic area. That’ll pull in your data set, then you have their profiles (and maybe Klout score) to qualify who should be approached. First Aid Shot Therapy asked for addresses via direct message, offering privacy but also increasing follower counts. Both parties need to be following each other to direct message on Twitter. The end result was influencers saying this new product is great. Much more valuable than a newspaper ad.

 ReadyPulse

Seattle has always been a little different for marketing campaigns. I don’t think I’ve ever seen agencies advertising jobs on billboards or buses in any other city. Therefore ReadyPulse’s low cost and low-key outdoor marketing campaign shouldn’t have been a surprise. ReadyPulse has a marketing suite (their jargon) that helps you recruit and manage ambassadors and sponsored athletes online. A valuable and important tool, that’s not being offered by many.

I’m assuming it’s part of the Silicon Valley company’s push into Seattle (my jargon), and very creative. They’re taped flyers to power poles in downtown Seattle streets. I’m not sure how far they’ve spread, but I’ve mainly seen them between a major transit spot and South Lake Union, i.e. Amazon and a sea of start-ups. The flyers are too swish to be mistaken for the usual house to rent ads.

ReadyPulsePulseReady

Forever 21

Here’s my not-so-brilliant marketing campaign. Apologies for the not-so-brilliant photo. The window was clean and iPhones have great cameras. In hindsight, I’m not sure if this is a bad campaign or just a representation of current society. And not in a positive way. Forever 21, the teen to young adult clothing company has a new Barbie range. My first disgust was that they chose to have a Barbie range when Barbies are being ridiculed as poor role models for young girls. Then I thought of some young 20-something women I know. There is a trend of regressing back to childhood, so maybe this was a genius move and I’m just too old.

Barbie Marketing Campaigns

 

What brag-worthy campaigns have you seen recently? Please share in the comments.

What’s your customer service strategy?

Posted by on Wednesday, 20 August, 2014

Brian Solis - Customer ServiceWhen I started my first customer service job in 1994 it was easy. If a customer had a complaint they called or dropped by. Occasionally they wrote a letter. Sure the grumpy ones told their friends over the garden fence, but that was just the neighbor.

That was 1994. Now it’s 2014.

Brian Solis recently said that an unhappy customer tells 20 people. A happy customer will tell only one. I recall hearing similar numbers back in 1994.

But in 1994 telling 20 people about a poor customer service experience wasn’t a crisis. Social media has given a new customer service tool. It has also given customers a new, public voice.

Let’s look back at the 20 people who hear about the poor experience. Imagine if one of those tellings was a facebook post. The average facebook user has 338 friends, which instantly turns that 20 into 357. Add in a Twitter account and it’s 576. That’s a lot different than a gossip session over the fence.

What can you do about it?

If you’re already listening to your customers (including on social media) and offering great customer service to minimize any poor experiences, give yourself a pat on the back. Well done.

If you’re not there yet, it’s not too late. Look at your policies and your team. Is that how you’d want to be treated? Yes, it will mean some changes and probably cost you some money, but can you afford to lose 20 customers for each poor experience? To quote Brian Solis (again), “Customers have to be asked and rewarded. It’s something new. It’s proactive customer service.” This is from a social customer service video series that he’s doing with Hootsuite. There’s also his book, [What's the Future] of Business?

And you can always email or Tweet me.

Hootsuite University – Six Months Later

Posted by on Saturday, 9 August, 2014

HootSuite Certified ProfessionalOne of the most popular pages on here is the post announcing my Hootsuite University certification. Understandably people want to check it before pulling out their credit card. I know I did.

Was Hootsuite University Worth It?

The short answer is yes.

As I mentioned in the original post, I did more work to become certified than I needed to. I could have done three courses, I did 10. I just felt it was too easy with just the three and the instructions weren’t clear. Fortunately the videos were easy to follow and some of the courseware is beginner level. I also had the advantage of having come back to Hootsuite after using Sprout Social for nearly a year.

So, what did I gain apart from $21 of credit card loyalty points each month and my name on a website?

How about a new client? In March I was asked to help a local foundation out with their digital execution for a few weeks. They were a Hootsuite Enterprise client and didn’t have a lot of time to train the contractor. Being Hootsuite University certified meant it was one less thing to train. Oddly, I’m still working with that foundation as their acting Communications Manager.

After my first day with that client I used another benefit of Hootsuite University – the additional training. There are four courses on just Hootsuite Enterprise, but also five sets of videos. The videos take you through how to grow and engage your social media audiences, becoming a social business, best practices and then by department and industry sector. That night I started with the Enterprise then hit the non-profits. The videos are interviews with leaders in those sectors, so you’re not just hearing from the Hootsuite team.

The final favorite benefit is #HSUChat. This was actually the first one I got into and now I’m disappointed I travel between clients and miss it. For those not in a car at 11am on Tuesday, follow #HSUchat for insightful discussion. The topic is generally announced on the Monday and is often lead by a social media manager who has had success in that area. The chat isn’t restricted to Hootsuite University graduates, so just in to the conversation.

There are more benefits, like being listed in the directory, but I don’t know if I’ve directly benefited from that. no one has mentioned that’s how they found me.

Do you have any questions about the certification? Add them in the comments. Oh, and if you’re one of the people Googling to find the Hootsuite University exam answers, just watch the videos and stop being lazy. Don’t deny it, Google Analytics tells all.

Book Review: Human to Human

Posted by on Wednesday, 6 August, 2014

Human-to-HumanThere was nothing profound in Human to Human: #H2H. There was nothing even new, and that’s the way it should be. Human to Human: #H2H by Bryan Kramer is the hot business book of the summer.

For the few of you who haven’t heard about Human to Human or seen the #H2H tweets, it’s a book dispelling the B2B and B2C sales concepts. After all, we’re all humans.

Those who know me are familiar with my rants on this. I can’t recall if I’ve mention it on here, but I kind of, may have, rudely called people out-of-date when they’ve suggested we need to have B2B or B2C focuses. Now I can just send them the link to this book and be done with it.

For an example, here’s the introduction:

“Communication shouldn’t be complicated. It should just be genuine and simple, with the humility and understanding that we’re all multi-dimensional humans, every one of which has spent time in bot he dark and delightful parts of life.

That’s human to human.”

In a short 68 pages, Bryan explains why. Using recent and public cases, and even one of his own projects that went astray, he describes human behavior and what we need to do as communicators and marketers to appeal to our audiences, regardless of their segment.

Short videos embedded through the ebook have experts explaining their experiences. If you’re like me and don’t like video, you won’t lose anything by skipping them, but you will gain a lot from watching them. I didn’t make many notes through #H2H (it is rather short and reinforced my existing beliefs) but these did stand out:

  • “we all need to speak more human”
  • lines between B2C and B2B are blurred (paraphrased)
  • context and understanding your audience
  • rules of social context

Yes, once again my notes make no sense on their own.

Who is Human to Human: #H2H for?

Any marketer or communicator that needs a reminder that they’re appealing to humans, irrespective of the purchase context. Oh, and all who need a kick up the butt to get up to speed.

Go, read it now. You’ll regret it otherwise.