Posts Tagged Marketing

Book Review: Brand esSense

Posted by on Sunday, 20 April, 2014

Brand-esSenseI actually finished Brand esSense by Neil Gains a few weeks ago. I’m glad I fell behind with reviews though. Last week a friend and I chatted about the popularity of a branding session at the recent Market Mix conference. We couldn’t understand why marketers are confused by branding, when it’s essentially unchanged since the 1940s. That’s when brands were first described as anthropological concepts.

Without that discussion, I would have deemed Brand esSense an overly academic, deep read in a short book. It is an academic deep read in 232 pages, but it’s also an excellent bridge between the sensory aspects of brand and how they are used with current marketing tactics.

Who is Brand esSense for?

This needs answering a tad earlier than usual. Brand esSense is for the experienced marketers, like the ones at Market Mix. The ones with brand theory knowledge. This book skips the basics and jumps straight into the psychology behind the components of brands. It’s a heavy book.

Does it Really Go That Deep?

Yes, it does. After reading this book you’ll know which colors elicit anger, why to use smell, and creating archetypes, among others. See, I said it’s detailed.

The detail makes it a hard hard read. It’s also not linear so concepts jump around, which can be confusing. Archetypes is one. While this sounds nasty, especially when you look at other books like Seth Godin’s lighter reads, I recommend Brand esSense, just for a more academic read or experienced marketer. The detail includes some amazing research. Both scientific research and case studies explain and show how each concept helps form a brand.

And if Brand esSense gets too dry, skip to chapter eight. It’s a great summary of the book and gives enough detail to stand on its own.

Note: Being an Australian in the US meant the play on essence really confused me. I’ve been i the US long enough now to confuse Australian/UK English and did actually check spelling before posting this. Tangent, but I hope you weren’t confused too.

What’s your ROI?

Posted by on Tuesday, 11 March, 2014

What's your ROIMy first marketing lecturer, Dr Mario Miranda, taught me the relationship between price and quality. His example was a Waterman pen versus a Bic disposable. While my tastes are more Mont Blanc, the premise stands. Why do we choose Apple, Nordstrom and Mercedes Benz?

Why don’t we apply the same premise to ourselves? What’s your ROI? Does your price equal your quality?

I was chatting with a colleague last night about clients wanting expert work done at junior rates. We’ve all encountered it, “I’d love to hire you but [insert name] is $500 cheaper.” On eLance, I’m asked to pitch for work at hourly rates lower than the minimum wage in that country. The RFPs are filled with “expert” and “top performing”.

As marketers, we have a choice to make. We can take the work and discount our rates, or we can walk away. We can decide if we see ourselves as a Kia or a Mercedes Benz. In other words, what’s your ROI?

I know you’re thinking, “There’s more to the job than money, Bianca”, and I agree. Sometimes it’s a job title, resume points, or brand names that make up the difference. I’m doing some work currently that gives me studio photography experience. But that’s part of the ROI calculation. I gain experience and a small amount of cash; they get product photography.

It’s when the returns don’t equal or exceed investment (in this case you) it harms the entire industry. Precedents get set, your price goes down and you turn from Apple to Samsung. It’s hard to recover from this, and near impossible if it’s across the industry.

Yes, this was written as a vent over a recent situation, but also because walking away from a particular project was one of the hardest things I’ve done. The ROI figure just wasn’t a good result and saying yes now will mean it gets pushed further and further with each contract renewal. I hope I’m never in this situation again.

Book Review: Digital Branding

Posted by on Monday, 3 March, 2014

Digital-BrandingDigital Branding by Daniel Rowles is exactly the digital marketing book I would write. It’s current, relevant, very practical, honest, and topical. Perhaps a little too much so. I can see some “old-timers” being intimidated by the practices Rowles demands.

The book is divided in three parts. The first is an introduction to digital branding with some great definitions. This is where the “love” count started early. Yes, most digital communications about a brand don’t directly include the brand. Yes, it needs to be measurable. And my favorite, verbatim, “brand awareness is a phrase that is often used to justify digital activity that doesn’t have clear objectives”. I’m not telling which early project I worked on where this was a common management line.

Digital Branding’s value is in the second part: The Digital Toolkit. It’s practical and realistic, suggesting free tools, and acknowledging the top end of the market, like Google Analytics Enterprise. Intermixed are case studies and advice, with gems like only doing something if you have something to say, and that social media is essentially PR.

Part three, Strategy and Measurement, is the weakest, but only in parts. The strategy chapter is less tangible fluff. This is made up in the next chapter. Analytics describes useful reports in Google Analytics. I love (yes, love count was high) the reminder that a high bounce rate isn’t bad if the customer got what they needed.

Who is Digital Branding For?

I think my annotation here was perfect: “Am I loving this because it reinforces my ideas and it’s actually too basic? Who is this for?”

It’s detailed enough for experienced digital marketers, but clear enough for marketers new to digital, or even non-marketers. Of course, the newer you are the more you’ll get from Digital Branding, but I picked up some tools from the kit and a couple of tips.

This book isn’t release until April, but I recommend it. In fact, I’m buying a copy. My ARC was produced too early for all the tables to be included.

This Valentine’s Day, All You Need is … Evernote Market

Posted by on Monday, 10 February, 2014

This week is Valentine’s Day. That day of the year filled with cheap chocolates, hard-to-get dinner reservations, and women in the office comparing the size of their bouquets.

It’s a great sales opportunity, but what do you do if your product isn’t all hearts and cherubs?

Last week I received a Valentine’s Day promotion email from Evernote. You know, that information management app. Here it is.

Evernote-Valentines-Day

I suspect your first reaction is the same as mine, “Really? Valentine’s Day? Evernote’s not romantic.”.

Then I thought about it. I am the target market.

No one could ever get my attention with flowers and hearts, and I can never imagine dating anyone who gets into Valentine’s Day. And I’m not alone.

With this email, Evernote has expanded the Valentine’s Day market size. Now it includes all those people, like me, who ignore Valentine’s Day.

So the lesson is to be creative and find your market. You may be fortunate, like Evernote, and create a new one.

Happy Valentine’s Day.

Book Review: Klout Matters

Posted by on Sunday, 22 December, 2013

Klout_MattersKlout Matters (Gina Carr and Terry Brock) is as close as you can get to a book-sized advertisement for Klout, without it being written by Klout.

If you’re wanting to know how to game your Klout score, then this is the book for you. Yes, I went there. Despite how many times the authors claim you can’t and they’re not instructing how to game Klout, this is a book how to game your Klout score.

The authors want this book to be a fair, definitive guide to Klout. There’s even an entire chapter on Klout’s shortcomings. It’s towards the back and positioned as their wishlist for development. Despite my personal dislike of Klout, I’m trying to be fair in this review. Author bias aside, there’s one major flaw with this book, the editing. I’m not sure any was done. My copy was a pre-release from NetGalley, a few days before its official release, so I can excuse the switching between podcast and pod-cast. I can’t excuse the inconsistent claims and weak narrative.

With some editing, this could be great. I’m afraid many would put it down before getting to chapter four and discovering why a Klout score is important or relevant. Also, mid-way through we’re told we must be content creators, but later we’re told to be expert content curators. Which is it? Personally, I think a mix. I’m also not sure who the book is targeting. It’s 90% at individuals for personal branding, but then a random corporate reference appears.

The marketing concepts are also a tad dated. Audiences and targeting are rarely mentioned, even within the tips on using social media to increase your Klout score. Chapter ten is definitely the most useful. It discusses getting to know your key influencers, putting value first, and, amusingly, that it’s not all about your Klout score.

Who is Klout Matters for?

This is tough. Probably people who are wanting a numeric score as a trophy, and are trying for freebies from companies. Not marketers who are wanting to see if Klout is relevant for their brands.

If there’s a second edition, with some strong editing, Klout Matters can be a useful book. Assuming Klout still has clout.