Book Review: The Business of WinningThe Business of Winning: Strategic Success from the Formula One Track to the Boardroom by Mark Gallagher
Published by Kogan Page on October 28th 2014
Pages: 256
Source: NetGalley
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I received this book for free from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.

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The Business of Winning by Mark Gallagher is probably the business book I need to defend reviewing the most. It was also the most fun to read. Little known fact, I used to be a massive Formula 1 fan. Even beating the boys in a F1 tipping contest. Unfortunately Australian timezones aren’t conducive to watching races at midnight and holding down a day job. A move to the States didn’t really help either.

Back to The Business of Winning. I pounced on this when it came on NetGalley. Mark Gallagher started off as a reporter covering Formula 1 before moving into PR and comms, before executive management. His 30 year career means he worked with the greats of Ayrton Senna, Murray Walker, Damon Hill, and a fanboy of Michael Schumacher. Shush, I still have a little bit of a crush on Jacques Villeneuve. Schumi favoritism sticks out.

I’m getting off track. Hey, I did warn it was a fun read. This book is actually a hard one to review as a business book. Yes, it’s filled with real examples of the need for communications, and branding and innovation, however it’s much much more than that. It’s probably about 80% memoir and 20% business book. That mix will, unfortunately, be a hindrance to mainstream success. It will definitely limit the audience.

Each chapter has a different focus: leadership, brand, performance management. It’s a chapter of themed memoirs, with bullet points at the end linking the memoirs back to lessons learned. Sometimes I had a little trouble recalling the focus for the chapter, but I did read an unedited proof (thus messy formatting) and was spasmodically reading in between school for the semester and starting a new main gig.

The memoirs and examples are brilliant. Really, I would read this just as a memoir. I loved hearing the behind the scenes of races I watched, and hearing the paddock gossip. It is naturally very Jordan heavy; that’s where Mark spent most of his career. This was also the racing era when I was following, so I loved it for that.

Who is The Business of Winning for?

It’s for F1 fans in business. I’m not sure there’s enough business for anyone else. It’ll be more useful and successful in Europe where there is a decent F1 following. I accept that Seattle won’t get a signing. Darn.

Buy it, read The Business of Winning and tell me if you agree.

And Mark, if you write a book about the time Eddie Irvine was renting your room, I’m buying multiple copies.