7 WordPress Tips for Marketers

Wordpress-tips-for-marketersThe WordCamp Seattle team shook things up a little this year and divided the popular conference into two distinct conferences. Experienced was a week ago, and we have to wait for October for the Beginner Edition. As a marketer, I’m not sure how I feel about it. It was harder to decide if there was enough for me, but the conversations were also deeper than previously. For marketers, it graduated more to client relationships and projects with less software how-to.

WordPress Tips for Marketers

Keep it simple for clients and stakeholders

Anything more than the “what” may be confusing, and we don’t want confused clients.

Price is not a quality indicator

You can pay for a fortune for a broken website, or get an amazing one cheap. But it takes research and knowledge to know the difference.

You cannot engineer without a plan

If you’re a marketer needing clarification on this, you need to revise marketing 101. Plan, people, plan.

Build for the way people use it

WordPress is fully customizable, even the dashboard. There’s no need to make people conform to the software. They won’t do it anyway.

Teamwork – the project management app

It’s everything you wanted BaseCamp to be. Gantt charts, milestones, unique email addresses, and easy to use. Bianca note: I haven’t tested this yet, but just the rave reviews mean it’s on the shortlist for an upcoming project.

WPHelp plugin

My note from WordCamp is “creates customizable help files” – I think that’s enough said to know how useful that is.

Coschedule

This is another one on my must test list. It is for creating content calendars.

Extra WordPress Resources

Bob Dunn offered a few resources that look useful, and I recommend you check them out.

  • WPBeginner blog
  • WP101 – it’s a premium site of video tutorials. Videos aren’t my thing, but if they’re yours, Bob recommends it.
  • sidekick – training plugin within WordPress – this is rather cool.
  • Co-Authors Plus – a plugin to let you give bylines to post authors without creating WordPress user accounts for them.

If you’re curious about the photo. Eric Amundson from IvyCat had us all doing power poses to end his season on an Introvert’s Guide to Marketing your WordPress Business. The other sessions I attended were Amanda Blum‘s session on creating sustainable long-term client relationships, and Bob Dunn’s discussion of teaching your clients.

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